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AP - College Board logo

Biplove
Baral

Brophy College Preparatory|Phoenix, AZ
Teacher: Cooper davis
2-D Art and Design
College Board is pleased to showcase Biplove Baral as part of the 2021 AP Art and Design Exhibit
Corporate Greed and Environmentalism|8 x 9 in.
Idea(s): Explore how environmental issues and corporate greed are closely tied together. Material(s): Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, and Adobe Illustrator Draw Process(es): explored the issue of Oak Flat, created that graphic on illustrator and added it to graphic of greed
I realized how deeply greed was related to the issue at Oak Flat. Oak Flat is a sacred Apache site that was set up to be destroyed through copper mining by a foreign mining conglomerate.
Student
statement
The title of this work is Corporate Greed and Environmentalism. This piece was created to explore the intertwined nature between greed and environmental issues. The components centered around the concept of “greed” were created for the school newspaper. Specifically, the theme of the newspaper that month was “follow the money,” a theme that immediately inspired me to think of greed. The second component of the piece is centered around a physical event held in February of 2020.
While creating the promotional art for this event, I realized how deeply greed was related to the issue at Oak Flat. Oak Flat is a sacred Apache site that was set up to be destroyed through copper mining by a foreign mining conglomerate. Additionally, this piece is best understood if you learn more about this issue, and I suggest listening to the podcast, Endangered Spaces—Oak Flat, as a way to start. Ultimately, greed was at the core of this issue and this realization prompted me to think about how I could mix my two art pieces together. That is when I started creating the final piece which you see in front of you.
Listen to the podcast, Endangered Spaces—Oak Flat, Here

Embedded with permission from https://dirtbagdiaries.com/endangered-spaces-oak-flat/


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Biplove Baral
Untitled|18 x 14 in.
Material(s): Adobe Illustrator Process(es): Developed on adobe illustrator with inspiration from Apache Stronghold graphics.
Untitled|12 x 8 in.
Material(s): Adobe Illustrator, Illustrator Draw Process(es): Created for a newspaper, developed on illustrator, colors chosen to maximize vibrancy when printed.
Untitled|16 x 11 in.
Material(s): Newspaper, Illustrator, Photoshop, Illustrator draw Process(es): Added image 11 to photoshop, included student newspaper articles, printed over 300 copies.
Teacher
statement
Cooper Davis
Biplove Baral’s portfolio is just a small glimpse into how he has used art to inspire our community to act upon issues of social justice. While most students wait for formal exhibitions to showcase their work, Biplove ensured his designs and messages were ubiquitous throughout our campus. From posters to social media campaigns, and even a 40-foot long mural; his distinct style became the visual language of advocacy in the community.
In the studio, Biplove spent equal time organizing advocacy events as he did producing his art, in an unusual balance that gave greater meaning to both. His use of the visual elements is directly tied to his personal responses as he dove deeper into each campaign, thus creating compositions that spark interest in the viewer and engage them to join in the fight for justice. Biplove achieved excellence on this portfolio by incorporating his passions with his craft and displaying mastery of his own style through experimentation, revision, and an impressive understanding of the principles of design.
Principal
statement
Robert E. Ryan
Over the last few years, our students have been engaged in several inspiring and incredibly effective advocacy efforts. They have successfully lobbied the state legislature to extend in-state tuition to dreamers, they managed to halt the destruction of the sacred Oak Flat site, and they convinced our own Board of Trustees to transition to solar power. Biplove Baral was not only a key member of each of these advocacy teams, he was the one who gave life to the efforts through his compelling artwork. It’s fitting that he’s been selected for this exhibition because he deserves the credit- credit he never sought on campus. Biplove’s artwork served as a catalyst for change on our campus and across our state. I look forward to watching all the ways his artwork will continue to inspire others in the future.
Biplove Baral