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2-D Design
Hilyd Mirabal
Miami Arts Studio 6-12 @ Zelda Glazer|Miami, Florida
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Untitled|12 x 24 in. Idea(s): This is Bolivar Square in Bogota. We used to come to this plaza every month to feed the birds. Material(s): Linoleum block print, speedball cutter, and block printing ink. Process(es): I sketched the buildings and then carved it all out. I then used ink to print it on to paper. Curatorial Note: Printmaking that tells a story of place and presence.
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Student
statement

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Hilyd Mirabal
How have the places where we have lived made a mark on your life? How do these places help shape the person you are today?
Life is a force of constant movement that makes us navigate from place to place, sometimes unexpected places, calm places, traumatic places, emotional, and decisive places. Art allows you to relive your memories and materialize them in form and color. My technique of carved lines in a variety of printmaking using a linoleum sheet allowed me to immerse myself in the sincere memories of my childhood, of those vivid places full of lines and buildings. As Winston Churchill stated, “We shape our buildings; thereafter, they shape us.” My carvings printed on linoleum blocks represent three places, three architectures, and three experiences lived. New Jersey, Colombia, and Miami. These three places have sculpted who I am today through the relationships I made there, the culture I experienced, and the lessons I learned.
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Declaración
del
estudiante
Come te marcan los lugares donde has vivido? Como estos lugares te ayudan a conformar la persona que eres hoy?
La vida como fuerza de constate movimiento no hace navegar de lugar a lugar, a veces lugares inesperados, lugares con calma, lugares tormentosos, emocionales y determinantes. El arte te permite revivir tus memorias y materializarlas en forma y color.
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Untitled|12 x 24 in. Idea(s): I grew up on this street. The clock shows the time I was born and the bakery sign has my birth year. Materials: Linoleum block print, speedball cutter, and block printing ink. Process(es): I sketched the buildings and then carved it all out. I then used ink to print it on to paper.
Curatorial Note: Printmaking that tells a story of place and presence.
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“How have the places you have lived made a mark on your life? How have these places helped to shape the person that I am today? My sustained investigation is divided into 5 places: New Jersey, Colombia, Miami, Texas and Boston.”

Teacher Statement

Brian Reesy
To help students best grasp the concepts of inquiry-based methods, I began the course with art projects centered around concepts and topics that required students to respond with subjective, personalized answers both visual and written. When Hilyd began her sustained investigation, she applied the same problem-solving practices to formulate a unique and creative topic that reflected her individual style and sensibility. Throughout the course, her sketchbook was also used as a journal, where ideas could be fleshed out with words and images simultaneously. Hilyd was also aware of the concept that although art is a form of visual storytelling, it was not necessary to spell everything out for the viewer.
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The use of visual symbolism can be a powerful tool when conveying ideas and concepts. Hilyd’s theme was personal, powerful, and moving. She beautifully captured the nuances of her life journey through her images. Because the class is a diverse group of artists with a variety of skill sets, it was advantageous to utilize strategies that would play to their individual strengths, and Hilyd used her strengths of visual narrative with grace and bravado. Many class sessions were dedicated to experimentation with media: drawing, painting, printmaking, digital and mixed media. By exposing them to a wide variety of artistic techniques, they were able to individually choose the medium that had the right fit for their concepts. Hilyd discovered that block printing was the most appropriate medium for her portfolio, as the graphic quality of the technique complimented the deeply personal nature of her concept. Formative and summative assessment is crucial for any art class, especially AP, where the criteria for artistic success is more nebulous than in academic courses. Students must be allowed creative freedom for maximum impact of artistic expression, but a rigid framework of the elements of art and principles of design can help to cement the necessary requirements for artistic excellence, regardless of a student’s style or concept. The most successful creative programming in my class was the encouragement to participate in art exhibits and competitions. I am proud of my student achievements in the competitive art world, where their work was juried and awarded in galleries and museums. Hilyd’s artwork was chosen for the prestigious Museum Education Art Competition, one of the crown jewels of the Miami-Dade Public Schools competition season. What I learned from working with Hilyd is that sometimes only the slightest bit of encouragement can lead to amazing things. The fact that Hilyd was able to take core memories that were both joyous and devastating and to funnel those emotions into images that create a lasting impression for any viewer is an outstanding achievement. My school principal Miguel Balsera, is an avid supporter of our art program and ensures that our students can take full advantage of any resources that will nurture their artistic growth and enrichment. My advice to other AP art teachers is to listen carefully to their students. When Hilyd told me of her personal story, I was deeply moved and knew that I had a responsibility to do everything in my power to help guide her through her artistic journey.
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Untitled|12 x 15 in. Idea(s): My curly hair represents the river and how I finally felt grounded in Miami. Miami is my home. Material(s): Linoleum block print, speedball cutter, and block printing ink. Process(es): I sketched the buildings and then carved it all out. I then used ink to print it on to paper. Curatorial Note: Printmaking that tells a story of place and presence.
“My curly hair represents the river and how I finally felt grounded in Miami. Miami is my home.”
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Hilyd Mirabal